Baylor Faculty and Students Receive Louisville Institute Grant Awards

May 29, 2024

Three faculty members and three doctoral students from the Baylor University College of Arts & Sciences have received 2024 grant awards from Louisville Institute.

Louisville Institute, which is funded by the religion division of Lilly Endowment, has a mission to "bridge Church and academy through awarding grants and fellowships to those who lead and study North American religious institutions, practices, and movements, and thereby promoting scholarship that strengthens Church, academy, and society, and ultimately contributes to the flourishing of the Church," according to the Institute's website.

The Baylor winners of 2024 Louisville Institute grant awards include:

*Dr. Beth Allison Barr, The James Vardaman Endowed Professor of History -- recipient of a Louisville Institute Sabbatical Award for the project "Left Behind: How Southern Baptists Forgot Medieval History and Why It Matters for Women." The award "provides sabbatical grants up to $40,000 to support research projects about Christian faith and life, the practice of ministry, religious trends and movements, Christian and other faith-based institutions and religion and social issues."

*Dr. Joao Chaves, assistant professor of religion -- recipient of a Louisville Institute Sabbatical Award for the project "Migration, Money, and Mission: Immigrant Christians and Global Proclamation."

*Dr. Ericka Dunbar, assistant professor of religion –– recipient of the Louisville Institute First Book Grant for Scholars of Color for the project "Migrant God, Migrating People." The award "provides grants up to $55,000 to assist early career, pre-tenured religion scholars of color to complete a major research project about Christian faith and life, the practice of ministry, religious trends and movements, Christian and other faith-based institutions, and religion and social issues."

*Leslie Garrote and Kathryn Freeman, doctoral candidates in religion -- each a recipient of a Louisville Institute Doctoral Fellowship Award, which "support(s) early career scholars considering vocations in theological education, and whose research has the potential to bridge church and academy and enrich the life of the church in North America."

*Ryan Ramsey, doctoral candidate in religion -- recipient of a Louisville Institute Postdoctoral Fellowship, which "provides early career theological educators with vocational and professional formation through a two-year placement as a visiting scholar at a graduate theological school, college, university, or education and research organization in the United States and Canada."